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Google Doodle: Remembering cosmologist Georges Lemaitre

Google Doodle: Remembering cosmologist Georges Lemaitre: On this 17th July, Google paid tribute to Georges Lemaitre, the Belgian priest, cosmologist, and astronomer. He is most famous and known for creating and for formulating the Big Bang Theory, which holds the whole universe that started in the cataclysmic explosion of small, primeval ‘super-atom’.

Born on 17th July 1894, the man whose theory and creativity is the testimony of the fact which raised questions on the non-existence of a higher being was quite ironically, a Catholic priest.

On this Tuesday, Google celebrated his birth anniversary with a GIF showing his picture with the ever-expanding universe, which can be shown and display in the background and on the backdrop.

A civil engineer, Georges Lemaitre has served as an artillery officer in the Belgian Army during World War I, then in 1923 he entered a seminary and was ordained as a priest.

He was also an alumnus of the University of Cambridge and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge where he arrived and grows up as an acquaintance with the findings of American astronomers Edwin Hubble and Harlow Shelpey.

He became the professor of astrophysics at the Catholic University of Leuven In 1927. The same year he proposed his Big Bang Theory that elaborate and explained the recession of galaxies within the framework of Einstein’s General Relativity.

His theory was confirmed and established by Edwin Hubble which is also regarded as Hubble’s Law in these contemporary times.

Post, this Lemaitre had delivered his lecture and theory to a group of some famous and respected scientists in 1933 at the California Institute of Technology, Einstein applauded him and quoted: “This is the most beautiful and satisfactory explanation of creation to which I ever listened.”

He also worked and did research on cosmic rays, the three-body problem that concerns itself with the mathematic description of the motion which is for the three mutually-attracting bodies in space.